Project 52 – Green

It’s week 11 of the Project 52 Pet Photographer’s blog circle. This weeks theme is “Green”… my favourite colour.

With the promise of spring, one can not help but associate the colour of green with hope, renewal and growth.

But interestingly, green also stands for a lack of experience and a need for growth… and it just so happens that this is exactly how I am feeling this week…very green indeed.

Enter Odin… a 5-month-old shepherd mix who somehow found himself alone and at Animal Services. He was safe there, but very very frightened… so much so that he completely shut down. I first met him last week while taking the adoption photos.

Once home I could not stop thinking about this poor little lost pup.

“Maybe we could foster” kept dancing around my head.

The thing is, my life is very comfortable right now. My hubby, Roland, and I are retired, we have only one dog… and she is the best dog ever! We have not fostered in about 20 years and haven’t cared for a puppy in… I don’t remember when.

Should we actually do this? Could we do this?

It took a day, but the thoughts never left so I finally broached the subject with Roland and showed him Odin’s photos.

“Go get him”, was all he said… and so that is what we did.

So now we are the proud foster parents of a very fearful, very cute, very big pup.

To say we are feeling a little green and overwhelmed is putting it mildly. Our saving grace has been Lacie. Odin LOVES her and will follow her anywhere and everywhere. Lacie has become his safe place. This is a very good thing as he still wants very little to do with us… but will tolerate our presence if Lacie is close by.

Baby steps are needed to build this pup’s trust with humans. “One day at a time” is our current mantra.

Here he is on his second day in our home. While outside, he tends to hide in amongst the trees but as long as Lacie is out there… so is he. The trees add a touch of green to our still very white world.

And to add a more traditional bit of March Green… Here’s Lacie.

Happy St. Paddy’s Day!

For ’tis green, green, green, where the ruined towers are gray,
And it’s green, green, green, all the happy night and day;
Green of leaf and green of sod, green of ivy on the wall,
And the blessed Irish shamrock with the fairest green of all.
~ Mary Elizabeth Blake

Project 52 _______________________
This post is part of the Pet Photography Project 52 blog circle. To see what the next photographer is sharing for the weekly theme, “Green”, visit Pet Love Photography, serving Greater Cincinnati, the San Francisco Bay Area, and destinations nationwide. Continue to click the link at the end of each post in the blog circle until you eventually find your way back here. Enjoy!

Project 52 – Depth of Field

The theme for week 10 of the Project 52 Pet Photographer’s blog circle is “depth of field”.

In photography, the term depth of field simply refers to the area of the scene which appears well in focus. When the depth of field is small, or shallow, the image background and foreground appear blurred, with only a small area in focus. A wider depth of field keeps most of the scene in focus.

The three main factors at work in obtaining the desired depth of field include the lens aperture, the focal length, and the distance between the camera and the subject.

A shallow depth of field is often used to isolate the subject from its environment while adding a pleasing artsy feel to the photograph. Obtaining the desired focus does take a little practice but the end results can be strikingly beautiful.

When photographing pets, I often strive for a shallow depth of field. I simply like the look and love how it makes the subject pop while adding some interest to the story being told.

The next photo is of my sweet Sadie and is one of my favourites. It speaks to me in so many ways, especially now that she is no longer with us.

Miss you Sadie Girl and your big hairy paws.

and the heart must pause to breathe…

And last but never least, here are a few of this week’s hopefuls from the shelter. A shallow depth of field, with the resulting blurred backgrounds, in conditions where the backdrops are limited, allows for a much more pleasing adoption photo.

“Since the background is as important as the subject, you mustn’t let it default by chance. You must control not only vertical and horizontal, you must be aware of the depth of field (or lack of it) that you want in the background.” ~ Jay Maisel

Project 52 _______________________
This post is part of the Pet Photography Project 52 blog circle. To see what the next photographer is sharing for the weekly theme, “depth of field”, visit Darlene Woodward with Pant the Town Photography serving MA and NH. Continue to click the link at the end of each post in the blog circle until you eventually find your way back here. Enjoy!